Sunday, Apr. 23, 2017

Bantam Goaltender: Practice 20

Butterfly Crawl – Staying on the Round

Butterfly Crawl – Staying on the Round – Review for Perfection

3 Minutes

First of all, remind the goaltenders that it is extremely important to be able to get into the correct spot in the right amount of time. Explain that if they are not able to travel from one side of the crease to the other side before the puck travels from one player to another, the player will probably have an open net to shoot the puck into.

Re-emphasize to the goaltenders that the Butterfly Crawl is an effective strategy in situations that require the goaltenders to arrive at different points around the crease due to the puck being moved or passed in tight. As an example, explain that the Butterfly Crawl can be used in various important situations; such as, when the puck is close to the top of the crease (in tight) and players are trying to move or pass it in order to get around the goaltender. The goaltender might not have the time to get up out of the butterfly (too many holes could open up), so he/she will push with the outside leg and stay low in a butterfly position to get to the correct spot.

Lead this drill by standing in the slot area and having the goaltenders perform the drill they learned in Lesson Nineteen. Make sure they remember how to perform the Butterfly Crawl-Staying on the Round Drill prior to going onto the ice so you do not have to waste time explaining it again. The goaltenders will work on this drill for three minutes.


Part Two:

Butterfly Crawl – Staying on the Round

7 Minutes

Drill Explanation: Re-emphasize to the goaltenders that it is extremely important to be able to get into the correct spot in the right amount of time. Explain that if they are not able to travel from one side of the crease to the other side before the puck travels from one player to another, the player will probably have an open net to shoot the puck into. This lesson will provide the goaltender with some continued practice on explosive power while maintaining low coverage of the net as well as proper positioning and angles.

Remind the goaltenders that the Butterfly Crawl is an effective strategy in situations that require them to arrive at different points around the crease due to the puck being moved or passed in tight. As an example, explain that the Butterfly Crawl can be used in various important situations; such as, when the puck is close to the top of the crease (in tight) and players are trying to move or pass it in order to get around the goaltender. The goaltender might not have the time to get up out of the butterfly (too many holes could open up), so he/she will push with the outside leg and stay low in a butterfly position to get to the correct spot.

Drill Preparation: Set ten to fifteen pucks up a different spots a few feet out from the top of the crease (mirroring the arc of the round crease.

 

Drill Execution: The first goaltender will begin in the proper ready position on one side of the crease on top of the round. On the shooter’s cue, the goaltender will begin Butterfly Crawling to the right (staying on the round) as the shooter shoots each puck (along the ice aiming for the 5-Hole). When the goaltender reaches the other side of the crease, the shooter will set the pucks up again and they will perform the drill in the opposite direction.

Each goaltender will perform the drill three times prior to switching with each other. The goaltenders must recognize that their upper body must shift to make sure the outside skate is aligned to push in the correct direction. Without the upper body shifting (rotating), the goaltender will travel in a straight line, getting into an incorrect position to stop the puck (unable to stay on the round).

Technique Critique:  As the goaltender is performing the drill, the coach should be attentive to the following points;

1. The goaltenders should have his/her stick on the ice from the time the drill begins until it ends.
2. The goaltenders’ glove and blocker should be placed out and in front (see the pictures of the Proper Ready Position - even when in the Butterfly position). The second picture shows how the goaltender has his glove and blocker out and in front acting aggressively.The third picture illustrates how the goaltender does not bring his glove and blocker out leaving more holes for the puck to see.
3. The goaltenders should be in a position to stop a puck at all times throughout the duration of the drill.
4. Butterfly Crawl – The lead pad should lie flat (the inside part) along the ice with the full pad facing the play in front.
5. The outside skate (pushing leg) will step in close to the opposite knee and then push out forcing the goaltender to move sideways. After the initial push, the goaltenders’ upper body will slightly rotate in the direction traveling so that the outside skate will be aligned to stay en route. After the slight rotation, the outside skate will quickly repeat the procedure by returning back near the opposite knee and pushing out forcing the goaltender to move sideways.
6. In a game situation, when the goaltenders reach their destination from Butterfly Crawling, they will close the holes and go into a proper Butterfly position and face the shot.
7. The goaltenders should understand that the power comes from the back leg and that the more push that is taken with the back leg, the more explosively they will travel.
8. As the goaltenders are moving after the initial push, their upper body should remain facing the play (or puck) out in front.
9. The goaltenders should not be worried too much on quickness prior to perfecting the skill of this move.

Pay attention to the proper Butterfly Technique:

1. The goaltenders’ stick blade should be flat along the ice.
2. The goaltenders’ glove and blocker should be high and out in front.
3. The goaltenders’ upper body should be sitting high (not with the goaltender’s bottom sitting on his/her heels).
4. The goaltenders’ knees should be closed tightly while the goal pads are flared out covering the low part of the net.

** As you can see in the pictures below, the second illustrates the goaltender with his gloves high and out in front (aggressively and properly). The third pictures illustrates the tendency that most goaltenders have by keeping their gloves in while not fulfilling an agressive position.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Video in Players Handbook